11 (Day 111)

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<p>I first learned about web design and programming in sixth grade. It was rea</p><p>lly basic HTML along with some sort of image editing s<br />oftware that created “J-P-E-G”s and gifs. Marrying my logical and <br />visual sides, this was the perfect medium for me to g<br />et into. Turning pure text into stylized text and shapes of differen</p><p>t colors is a beautiful type of magic that filled my brain with j<br />oy and wonder. My teacher Ms. Trask saw that I clear</p><p>ly excelled in it so for Christmas, she gave me a “T<br />each Yourself HTML 3.2 in 24 Hours” book (with CD-ROM!). There w<br />as a lot of material to cover, and some went ove<br />r my head, like the section about creating forms that i<br />nvolves back-end processes and services, which as a soo</p><p>n-teen, I clearly lacked access to. Regardless, I would sp<br />end most of my free time at the computer making <br />web pages, one better and more complex than the one before, and usually on one of </p><p>the many GeoCities accounts I’d created. Since then, I <br />had always assumed I would learn to really code someday and become an expert at both des<br />ign and programming. But visual design had <br />naturally became a greater focus, and programming had only become a <br />good-to-know. After college, I had the opportunity to work with the <br />startup Portal A as a contract designer of sorts<br />, and I designed the company’s first logo and we</p><p>bsite. It was the first time I had worked with PHP and jQ<br />uery, and while it was exciting to realize the powers of these two languages, I also started <br />to feel overwhelmed by the pressure of having to learn very quickly on the job </p><p>in my first professional project. When the opportunity to extend my role beyond the initia</p><p>l contracted project (logo and website), I had to decline for the benefit of the c<br />ompany and for the stability of my young career. When the iPhone de<br />velopment platform came out, I had high hop<br />es for things I could cr</p><p>eate. For two or three times in the past fi<br />ve years or so, I had tried to learn Objectiv<br />e-C and iOS development, but the la<br />nguage and structure was too different fro</p><p>m what I was used to, and without an actual and small pr<br />oject to work on, there was little motivation or di<br />rection to learn anything that I could practically us<br />e. So in the past year or so, I finally realized tha</p><p>t despite my seemingly unlimited ambit<br />on and excitement over every new s</p><p>kill I come across, there is only a limited amount of time I have and there are certain<br />n areas that I truly excel at. It is up to me to decide if I should continue and take the time t<br />o learn and master, or move on to another activity and discover ne<br />w things about myself. </p><p>Wit<br />h web and visual des<br />ign, I feel the level of <br />challenge is right where I need it to be, and wit<br />h programming, it is something that </p><p>I am glad to have a s<br />mall foundation in, and it is somethin</p><p>g I would pull out of my back pocket when necessa<br />ry, but for now, I will keep it as a side skill and def<br />er to the pros when it matters most. I pl<br />an to continue to keep up wi<br />th it once in a while and m</p><p>aybe learn a lit<br />tle more whenever I can<br />.

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13.

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