Tag Archives: connect

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Start with the End in Mind

“I have an idea. Let’s play a game. A puzzle game. Or maybe a numbers game? How about a word game? Or a scavenger hunt?”

On my twenty-ninth birthday, I published the first post of the “A Number of Things” series on my blog, and I continued to post one every eleven days for twenty-nine more times. The original idea of the series was to conduct a “social experiment” (an item on my “Before 30” list) where I post my thoughts on certain topics, embed hidden puzzles in the posts, and have the audience participate and work together to solve puzzles while using my posts as a springboard to learn about one another’s approach to life.

In short, my goal was to connect with the world. I wanted to develop both a relationship between the audience and me as the content creator and a relationship among the audience members to discuss the content and to collaborate on solving the puzzles.

Like most of my goals, I started with the end in mind, and worked backwards to figure out the details, timeline, and the amount of work and planning I would need to do. Typically, it’s the most logical and efficient way to accomplish goals.

For this goal and this project, I knew that I wanted to 1) share thirty posts regarding my approach and philosophy to life as I see it at the moment, 2) plant clues to puzzles for the audience to find and try to solve, and 3) enhance both my posts and the clues by accompanying them with something visual and creative.

I started creating posts with the sincerest of intentions, but by the third post, I quickly realized that I may have bitten off more than I could chew. Creating each post took a lot of time from my day-to-day life. To raise the level of complexity and planning that it needed to be a world-connecting-fuzzy-feeling-creating project would take even more work than I could afford. Still, I had many reasons to continue with the project, and even though I just started at the time and had a long way to go, it was subconsciously important enough for me to see it through.

Fortunately, the three things I knew I wanted to do (thirty posts, hidden puzzles, and visual pieces) addressed other smaller goals I had. So I pivoted a little bit and readjusted my plan based on those new smaller goals so the project could be more manageable. So in that sense, starting with the end in mind proved effective in that it allowed me to use what I originally planned, and then repurpose them for similar goals if necessary, all without needing to start over or give up.

Looking back, the series captured a good collection of my ideas about life, and it proved out numerous design experiments I wanted to try. Even though I knew from the first post that the topic of this post would be “Start with the end in mind.”, I was for a large part (as I mentioned in the second post) making it up as I went. As a result, the journey was both trying and delightful at times.

Yet for many reasons, I’m glad I did it, and I must be grateful for the way that I did. I had a grand and ambitious idea, and I ran with it. Fortunately, it was the type of project where I could start from the end and work backwards to build out a plan. But if I encounter projects where planning backwards feel impractical, I can always take another of my own advice: start somewhere.

See

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29.